David Leonhardt’s SEO and Social Media Marketing

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Archive for the ‘marketing’ Category

Digg Shouts are back! But not on Digg.

Monday, May 7th, 2012

Can you pronounce “Thruzt”?

The latest in the line of Digg-killers hits the streets…er…the Internet today.  And Thruzt is its name.  And it has several things going for it that should make Digg - and it’s evil twin Reddit - take notice.

I said at the time that Digg made a big mistake getting rid of “Shouts”.  Shouts were a means by which a Digg user could send a message to one, two three or any number of friends on Digg, seeking votes, comments, shares or whatever.

Shouts lasted only six months on Digg.  But ending them was a big mistake, because it sent people (like me) off-Digg to share content.  Mostly to Twitter.  And Digg lost users to Twitter.

Digg shouts are back, but they are not Digg’s.  They are called “Howls” and they belong to the latest upstart challenger to what is left of Digg (which is actually very little compared to Digg’s heyday when “Popping” to the front page was known to rash servers – when Shouts were part of its landscape).

Will you use Thruzt?

You can be forgiven for being skeptical about the success of Thruzt.  Other challengers have come and gone.  But Thruzt is different, and not just because of Howls.

First, Thruzt has a much more visual feel than any other social bookmarking or social voting website.  Yes, it has that Pinterest feel to it.  And in this day of the visual Web, that is a big bonus, because people will feel more comfortable browsing through the submissions.

Second, Thruzt has been previewed by a bedazzling line-up of many of the who’s who among Digg users.  It is hard to kick-start a new social bookmarking site.  But when so many “power users” are there to kick it off, I have to believe the odds are in its favour.

I was blessed with a preview of Thruzt before its public launch, and I asked its founder, Marcus Hirn (aka ZetaDog ), why he started Thruzt.

In a nutshell, he loved the old Digg, before Version 4, before Digg started bleeding members.  He doesn’t feel comfortable with Reddit’s layout.  And he kept seeing Digg lose members and lose community:

 “I waited for over a year. I stayed very loyal to Digg but when all my friends dropped off one by one, I decided to do something about it. I thought, well if Digg won’t fix itself then I might as well build my own site.  Being a web developer in my “normal” life helped. The process with thruzt started during the summer of 2011.”

I asked him what was different about Thruzt, and he talked a lot about the Pinterest layout and how it inspired him.

“But the problem was that their site did not provide me with a great tool to promote content to 3rd party sites. It is designed to keep members on their site with the occasional click through to original content.”

And the results are…

 So he put Thruzt together with what he saw was the functionality of Digg, the communications of Twitter and the layout of Pinterest.  And here is how he describes the result:

 “Instead of it being another social network I want visitors to see it as a game, where you use real life information, submit it and then try your hardest to get attention to it. You will need to be very clever, active and build a powerful network of friends in order become successful. Bear in mind not everyone wants that. I also want to have a site with great content. For instance we have a few interesting categories or  “paths” as we have chosen to name them. Military (marines, navy, army, cyber warfare), Household (with emphasis on family), and Body & Mind (with focus on the individual) as a few examples.”

I know more than a few people who have had dirty thoughts when the name “Thruzt” came up, so I asked Marcus where the name came from.

 “Ha, ha, ha… Well it started with my search for action words. I wanted to have a verb that could either inspire, give indication of what the site is about, and something that would mean “moving forward’ or “boosting”. I found a bunch of words I liked but as we all know, most names have been registered .com’s already. When I found that thruzt.com (a twist on the word thrust) was available I jumped on it. It answered all my wishes. Only a few moments after I registered it, did I realize the “pelvic thrust” association. I started laughing and the more I thought about it, the more I loved it. The only drawback with the name was the spelling. It is a bit too hard to memorize and spell. But I figured that if people learned how to pronounce and spell Schwarzenegger they could eventually learn the same with thruzt. I only later realized it is a great community gimmick. It attracts laughter and people are having fun with it. I want all visitors to be thruzted. It’s more fun thruzting together then thruzting alone and I’ll thruzt any of my friends gladly.”

I am in trouble.  I could never spell “Schwarzenegger” without seeing it first.

Markers, don’t beware…but be smart.

Given that this is a blog about marketing, I had to ask the question: “Let’s say you have a blog or a website to promote.  Will you have your head chopped off like at Reddit?  What are the boundaries a webmaster needs to follow to be cool on Thruzt?”

Good news.  You are free to promote.  Promotion and spamming are not the same thing, and Thruzt recognizes this.  There will be some rules so that it’s a fair game for all, so it’s smart to play by them.  Smaller niche marketing-related bookmarking sites like BizSugar and Blokube and My SEO Community and MMOsocialnetwork encourage self promotion.  Big general interest sites like Digg and Reddit (and the old Mixx and Propeller) have always discouraged it and would treat anyone promoting a website as if they were terrorists or rapists.

But at Thruzt it looks like the quality of the content and the quality of the networking are what really counts.  Promote your political views.  Promote your hobbies.  Promote a pic that grabs you or a story you find interesting.  Promote videos of your son’s yo-yo competition entries.  Or promote your own blog or website.  Just make it interesting to others.

“As I mentioned above, thruzt is a game of social networking. If blogs or site owners think that they need to submit every story on to thruzt let them. It will still require much more then submitting to get any attention. Please note all links are no follow until they pop. You will have to work each story on to the front page in order to have traffic (if that is what you are after). Nobody likes a spammer and I think webmasters will quickly understand this. There will be some common sense rules but no more restrictions are intended.”

He said a lot more on this to me, and I think it is worth reproducing it here verbatim.

 “It is wrong to confine user behavior. I want to give users the opportunity to choose their own path. On thruzt I have tried to give them the tools and will be adding more. I have no intention of trying to restrict members in their creativity and passion for sharing and promoting whatever content they want to highlight to the world. The only “restrictions” will be what I believe are common sense rules for a community to function and to fight spam etc.”

“For instance, on all social media there is a fear of “gaming” the system. That power users take over and the individual user is pushed aside. Well that is assuming that a community is only about “popping” a story to get traffic.”

“On thruzt I will have a new approach. I will not restrict users. No, instead I will encourage all users to learn the system. Figure out clever ways to push your own stories. I believe in free markets and freedom of choice. I believe in people’s ingenuity. Thruzt is meant not to be a ‘fair’ playground where “everyone gets equal attention”. No, thruzt should be looked at more as a game, where the player has to overcome obstacles and find ways to grow in power.

There are many ways to make yourself a name. You can become a great submitter of great content in your genre, you can become a very powerful and respected (and followed) commenter, You can become a great front page ‘popper’. Or you can be one of the unknown silent people who prefer to watch and read in the shadows, perhaps with the only interaction being a thruzt vote. There are tons of ways to get attention and I believe a great community will always reward people that are passionate and active. I will run thruzt with a motto I have lived my whole life by: ‘You get what you give’.”

So, it might be more than a hybrid of Digg, Pinterest and Twitter.  Thruzt might be the first “official” social voting game – where “gaming” the system is actually part of the game.

You can find me on Thruzt at http://thruzt.com/user/history/amabaie/.  And you can follow my Howls at http://howl.thruzt.com/amabaie/.  Let’s have some fun.

 


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How to Reach New Markets with Facebook

Monday, March 5th, 2012

Creating lasting connections was the idea behind the creation of Facebook. The network allows people to document friendships and keep any sorts of “promotions” lined up in one place, so it is no question why businesses started hopping onto the Facebook bandwagon. It’s a great place to reach new markets whether you’re a well-established business or just starting out.

Unfortunately, there are still businesses today that don’t take advantage of the benefits Facebook has to offer. Many businesses feel they are doing just fine with their current marketing strategies, and some claim that there are simply too many social networks to possibly keep up with them all. If you fall into one of these two categories or have your own reasons why you’re ignoring Facebook, it’s time to consider how you can reach new online markets with this social network.

Top 3 Ways to Discover New Online Markets with Facebook

The biggest myth about Facebook is the idea that it is simply another way to reach your already existing audience. However, Facebook works great if you’re looking to expand your audience and discover others who might be interested in your business—and you might be surprised with who you discover.

  1. Microtargeting – Many businesses immediately consider having a Facebook business page, but there are actually huge benefits that lie within the ads you see on Facebook. Facebook offers microtargeted ad campaigns where most target a small audience with customized messages. However, Facebook is now encouraging businesses to expand their audience base by testing different microtargeting standards. You can start with a large audience and then use Facebook ad analytics to see who is clicking on your ads. Although these initial ads will be someone broad, they will give you a brand new audience. Once you know who is clicking on the ads in your first test, you can start creating customized messages.
  1. Facebook Insight – If you have a Facebook brand page (aka a Facebook page for your business), you will have access to Facebook Insight. Facebook Insight is a way to gather information about your followers. You can learn where they are from, their age, what other companies they follow, etc. You might be surprised to find that most of your followers on Facebook are kids between the ages of 13 to 18. This will help you realize that you should change your promotions and advertisements to things that would appeal to this age group; an age group you may not have expected.
  1. Facebook Junkies – Many businesses are starting to offer promotions via their Facebook pages, and users are starting to catch onto this and pay attention. Facebook is a medium where approximately 845 million people feel comfortable (or at least take notice), so it makes sense that more and more people are turning to Facebook to learn about new businesses and find some great deals. Many people don’t even bother looking online anymore because they know they can look on Facebook. They are already using Facebook to chat with their friends, so when your company pops up on their feed their bound to give it a look. This is an entirely new audience that would have likely never found you had you not been an active member of the Facebook community.

How to Get Started with a Facebook Page for Your Brand

Whether you’re just starting a business or trying something new with your well-established business, Facebook brand pages are extremely easy to setup and use. Simply visit Create a Facebook Page and then enter in all the information required (city, description, type of company, etc.). Once you have your page setup, it will ask you if you have a Facebook account. If you do not, you have to click “I do not have a Facebook account” and then enter in your email address. This is a way to make sure that the right person has access to the account, so use an email address you know you will have forever.

You can also connect your blog to your Facebook page so that every time you upload a new blog post, it will update onto your Facebook page. You can do this through Twitterfeed. Once you’re set to go, you will have the option of writing status updates or connecting with customers and clients. The site will take you through all the steps and features of Facebook, so it’s easy to get started.

 

Amanda DiSilvestro is a writer on topics ranging from social media to VoIP phone service. She writes for an online resource that gives advice on topics including government small business loans to small businesses and entrepreneurs for the leading business directory, Business.com.

 

 


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Reputation Management: How Suze Orman Jeopardized Hers

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

This is the story of how NOT to manage your reputation online, following Suze Orman’s mess last week.

If you don’t know who Suze Orman is, she is (was?) one of the most respected personal finance gurus around.

And if you missed the “mess”, it started out innocently enough. Suze Orman released an “Approved” pre-paid debit card. It was a big publicity moment for her, and should have resulted in accolades and sunshine.

But something went terribly wrong.

Without going too deep into financial details, a pre-paid debit card can be a very useful tool for certain situations, and this card compares favourably to similar card, according to many analysts. But many personal finance bloggers were “shocked” and “surprised” that Suze Orman would be recommending a card like this at all, pointing out numerous less-costly alternatives. (If you wish to read more on the details from a financial perspective, there is a good round-up of related posts at Credit Cards Canada’s overview of the issue, but here are three of my favourites:

At Planting Money Seeds
At Free From Broke
At Hi That’s My Bike

And so the PR war begins.

And here the lesson begins.

Because Suze Orman struck back. Hard. And used some harsh language. She took on her challengers and called them names. The personal finance blogosphere is well-connected. They all read each others’ blogs and comment on them and follow each other on Twitter. If you check out any of the links I posted above, you will see what I mean.

And so, Twitter got real messy. These images are among those shared by Briana at 20 And Engaged.

You know she blew it. I am not saying that she no longer has any respect, but she sure lost a lot of it last week among a very important audience. What lessons can we learn from this?

DON’T GET PERSONAL.

What really set things off was when she called one well-respected blogger an “Idiot”. The rest of the personal finance bloggers circled wagons, especially because they had the same concerns about this whole Suze Orman Approved Card thing as the “Idiot” did.

To their credit, most of the bloggers kept it above the belt, and spent the rest of the week giving their analysis of the card itself and of pre-paid debit cards in general. In other words, they stuck to the issue, which is what Suze should have done. Did she really have a good product or was she just fleecing her starry-eyed followers?

STICK TO SUBSTANCE.

None of the bloggers (to the best of my knowledge) accused Suze of malice, and yet the whole affair left one feeling like she was trying to cash in on her celebrity status, misusing the trust her followers had placed in her and picking their pockets. All because of how she reacted, by throwing back insults rather than responding to the concerns and correcting misperceptions.

Instead of getting out her side of the story, she went off message (yes, this is sooooo like a political campaign screw-up).

RESPECT

OK, so let’s suppose you are really angry at somebody? Do you punch them in the face? Do you tell them to “Got to Hell!”. Do you call them an idiot? Of course not. No matter how angry you might be at the moment, you don’t want to burn bridges for things you will want to do in the future.

Social media is social. And it is amplified. It would be bad enough if Suze Orman had called a blogger an idiot in private. But she did it in public, in front of all her Twitter followers and, more importantly, in front of dozens – maybe even hundreds – of personal finance bloggers.

This showed at best pathetic judgment and at worst a mean and nasty streak.

Interestingly, a number of personal finance bloggers I know made comments to the effect of “I hope that was just some PR advisors that wrote those tweets, and not her.” I have my doubts. The first thing a PR person would advise her would be to stick to the issues, don’t get personal and don’t burn bridges. She did apologize later in the week, which sounds to me like she finally did get some PR advice.

If was her PR advisor, I would have tweeted back to the skeptics that they are missing the key point, and I would make that point. I would contact the blogger off-Twitter and request permission to provide a guest post – not to rebut his argument, but to explain why the card is indeed a good deal and why it is a step forward and look at all the good that can come out of it. He worst that can happen is a “No”…which would be far better than the huge loss of esteem she suffered last week. And the best would have been another platform to get her message out and at least to some degree neutralize the criticism that had been made.

By way of a wrap up, I came away with the impression that Suze Orman really does want to do something big with credit scores (which might be good), but could not resist the chance to make some nice cash from her followers. The combination of feeling righteous because she believes she is doing something positive and defensiveness due to guilt of having stepped over a line would explain her reactions.

But you and I will never know the truth behind all of this. We will only know what impression we are left with. Which is why online reputation management is so critical.

 


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Business Blog Commenting Carnival #2

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Welcome to our second “Business Blog Commenting Carnival”, an irregular feature where I share with you some of the comments I left on great posts from other blogs.

I answered the question Who’s the Real Boss in Your Business?

I say it is the customers. “The Customer is Always Right.” If the customer needs something quickly, I work overtime. If customers change their taste or preferences, my business better change to meet their demands.

When you are an employee, you have only one customer. You call him “the boss” or “the employer”, but the fact is that you are selling him some combination of your time, your effort and your expertise.

When you own the business, you have many bosses or employers. You call them “the customers” or “the clients”.

At 5 Techniques You Can Use to Take Your Internet Marketing Business to the Next Level in 2012 Danielle McGraw suggests to “Take it offline”. My thoughts on this?…

Indeed, most online folks really don’t think about taking things offline. But imagine the power of leaving sticky notes all over in public places: “Free download – make money online”. Or imagine handing strangers in the mall a business card that says: “A penny for your thoughts” with a penny taped to it, and a subheading: “Comment on my blog at http…”

Roberta Budvietas wrote that Civility Is important to Business Success. I agreed…

Civility is just another word for respect, or at least for demonstrating respect. If you don’t demonstrate respect, why would anybody do business with you?

At The Mystery of SEO, I found myself speaking in quite a counter intuitive fashion…

Anthony, on the whole I agree with your approach. However, I will take issue with the web designer who rejects any client not interested in an SEO analysis. The vast majority of websites will never rank well for any search phrase worth speaking of. There are simply too many more websites than their are available search phrases, and too many websites that are already very strong in most of those search markets. And as much as it might seem contrarian for an SEO specialist to be saying this, there are so many moire awesome ways to find a website than through search engine rankings. Radio ads. Print ads. Sponsoring YouTube or offline video, pay-per-click ads , guest blogging…and so many more. Many B2B websites have a very small niche clientele that can be best reached through trade shows and trade publications. Thinking the world revolves around SEO is the myopic miscalculation fostered usually by SEO specialists; how unfortunate that a web designer has also been infected.

Ming Jong Tey wrote about a link wheel strategy that works. I suggested an upgrade to that strategy…

Yes, the typical link wheel has fallen out of favour with Google. But the newer version is a lot of work. Creating several unique articles just to get a single link (Yes, you can pay $5 or $10 to have some regurgitated baby food pounded into something that looks like words, but do you really think Google is stupider than the folks who write that crap?) So here is an alternative:

Create a good article on a Web 2.0 site. Submit it to a couple appropriate social bookmarking sites for the niche. Comment on a couple good blog posts in the niche, using the article URL as your “website”.

There you go. You have created great content, engaged with bloggers and given real link juice to your hub.

This is not a blog, but rather a forum thread that asked: “I just started working for a local law firm and Im new to SEO. Im helping out with the link building campaign. I wanted to get some advice on a good strategy for building white hat back links for a local law firm?”

I disagree that anything you do to build links violates Google’s TOS. Links represent to Google “votes” for your content. In other words, if you have content worth linking to, you should get links, because links are the natural extension of everything you do, online and offline.

1. Ask clients if they can place a little acknowledgement on their website, linking back to your website. “Thanks to LAW FIRM NAME for helping us get our paperwork in order and setting up our business. (Links are not just about Google – they are first and foremost about referral business).

2. You want you site to have great, informative content, not just sales pages (I know I don’t buy from people tryin g to push a sale down my throat). It could be tips on how to avoid whiplash or how to determine what is false advertising or anything else that relates to the areas of law you practice. Then tell the world. Should it out on Twitter and FaceBook, on StumbleUpon and Chime.in, on Tumblr and Squidoo. The more people who discover your great content, the more people will share it and in some cases those shares will bring you links and in others “social signals” that the search engines value. But best of all, again, they will bring you referral traffic.

 


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Delegate Social Media Tasks? Ouch!

Monday, October 31st, 2011

File this one under “Do as the Pharisees say, not as they do”.

There is a certain marketing guru – yes, he is well-enough known and well-enough respected that the word “guru” applies – who recently sent me an email newsletter. Out of respect, all names have been changed in this blog post.

Before I tell you what was in that email, I should make very clear that this is someone whose opinions I respect. He always gives good advice and his newsletters are always worth reading. For the purpose of this post, it is worth noting that I frequently come across his articles posted at “one of my favourite social bookmarking websites” (OOMFSBW), and of course I vote them up.

The newsletter I mentioned earlier landed in my inbox. The gist of it was that one must be careful about outsourcing or delegating social media tasks – that one must be particular about choosing whom to ask to do such things for you.

The newsletter offered the suggestion that asking your little sister to handle your social media would be a great idea if she had taken courses in marketing communication. But it would be a bad idea if she was a high school student who likes to share cool music and daily tidbits on FaceBook.

It just so happened at the very moment that the newsletter arrived I had a story submitted to OOMFSBW mentioned above, and I was in need of a few votes. So I thought I would fire back a quick response asking him for a vote. In the context of his email newsletter, it seemed highly appropriate.

And in the context of his email newsletter, the response I got back could not have been more surprising – nor more ironic.

“This is Guru’s Director of Marketing, Jack. Guru is travelling at the moment, so I wanted to respond to your request. I didn’t understand what you were asking. I submitted the article to OOMFSBW and I friended Amabaie. If you could clarify what you are asking, that would help me to be able to help you.”

At first, I sat there stunned. Could a newsletter about carefully choosing someone who knows social media be followed up with a live example so poignantly demonstrating why it is crucial to do so?

So I explained.

“OOMFSBW is not just about submitting. You need votes. I vote for most of Guru’s stuff (pretty much any that I see). I would love Guru’s votes for the two I subbed today… (and I included my submissions URL again)”

Two days later, I received a note back.

“I understand now. I just voted for 7 articles for Amabaie.”

So I explained again.

“So also to understand, there is a limited window when the votes actually count. In the case of OOMFSBW , it is xx hours. In other cases, it is typically xx hours or xx days or a month. Just so you are aware in the future.”

As you can probably guess by now, this was total news to him. I think our friendly neighborhood marketing guru very amply demonstrated how crucial it is to delegate social media tasks to someone who knows social media.


Interestingly, I was reading the very next day on WeBlogBetter about whether one should delegate social media tasks to an intern. So, just for fun and because it is so on-topic with this post, let me share the comment I left at the end of the post.

“Hello. I would like to introduce everybody to our new company spokesperson, Rob-the-intern, and he will be managing our company’s entire reputation. Our credibility. Our image. The very factors upon which all our jobs depend. Please help me welcome Rob-the-Intern. I said, “Please help me welcome Rob-the-Intern.” Um…somebody? Anybody? “

 


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Occupy Google (radio satire)

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Google Doodles, beware! Today I will share with you an exclusive radio interview with Rankless Jones*, live at the scene of the “Occupy Google” protests.  After all, why occupy just a street, when you can occupy an entire website?

 


 

If Plan “B” is initiated, here are some of the unfortunate Google Doodles that we believe might be at risk, and are advised to take security precautions.

Vivaldi's birthday

 

Beijing Olympics

 

Google's 13th birthday

 

Art Clokey's 90th Birthday

 

The official first Google Doodle ever

 

The unofficial first Google Doodle ever

 

You can decide for yourself which Google Doodles are most likely to fall victim to the Occupy Google protests if the demands are not met, by visiting the Google Doodle Archive.

*Rankless Jones played by Chantalyne Leonhardt in her first international voice acting role.

 


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SocialFloat – social sharing widget

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Not every website is a WordPress blog.  That’s a pity, because WordPress has so many handy plugins.  SocialFloat is NOT a WordPress plugin – and that is good news if your website is not a WordPress blog, because this is for the rest of us.

You will surely have noticed on so many WordPress blogs a column of social voting buttons on the right or left of the page (see the right hand side of this page, for example).  These “float”, because even as you scroll down the page, they stay in the same place on your screen.  This makes it easy to share your content on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, etc.

 

 

That’s what Social Float does.  It encourages your visitors to share your content by keeping the share buttons constantly on their screens.  Why is this important?

  • You can generate a lot of traffic through Twitter and Facebook.
  • The search engines are paying attention to what pages and what websites get more shares and tweets, so it is important for SEO.
  • Your visitors don’t want to have to search for a share button all over your pages.
  • Your competitors on WordPress are using tools like this; you need to keep up.

I am making this social sharing widget available absolutely free.  You can download SocialFloat here.  You will get the exact code with clear and precise beta-tested instructions that even a relative newbie can add to their website.

 


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Italian food from a Chinese restaurant in Pakistan

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Most people do this when they get spam email:

Grrrrrr….!*$#@!+%$!*&

But sometimes, spam can be really funny.  Especially when it comes to pathetic target marketing (You know, like I really need my melons to be enhanced or my Brazilian to be waxed!).  In that same light, consider this ad I recently received:

 

 

 

Italian food from a Chinese restaurant in Pakistan…targeted to a Quebec-born Hungarian guy with a German name living in Ontario. Award-winning pizza?  Maybe.  Award-winning marketing?  I suspect that these guys would not recognize their target market even if they understood the concept.

Thanks for the laugh, guys.  I’ll have mine with green pepper and mushrooms.  Will you deliver in 30 minutes of less?

 


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Look what’s popping up on Google News these days

Monday, February 28th, 2011

Those people who use social bookmarking to promote their content have long debated the merits of various sites. Usually the analysis follows the lines of…

“Well, I get more traffic out of SBsite X, but barely anything out of SBsite Y.”

“Yeah, but it take only 4 votes to pop on SBsite Y.”  *See below for definition of “pop”.

“Hey, does anybody know on which site the links are DoFollow?”

“On both, I think, but only if you pop.”

Well, here’s a new reason to use social bookmarking websites.  We have been helping a client with a campaign to end penny production in Canada.  This is all about visibility, engagement, differentiation and cresting an identity in a niche that is otherwise pretty bland – credit card applications.  Of course, we put the story on a number of social bookmarking websites.  The story sat on Kirtsy for a few days.  Then it popped.  Among my next Google Alerts for “Canada penny” came the post on Kirtsy and a related post on PFbuzz, as well.  Interestingly, the post on PFbuzz had popped three days earlier.  I am not sure what this means.

What I do know is that Google News is picking up more stories from social bookmarking websites, specifically when the stories pop.  This really is not surprising – a story popping is a great way to distinguish the cream from the crap.  But this does appear to be new, at least the first time I see it happening.

POP your stories

What are some of the most important things you need to do for your stories to pop?

  • Make sure the story is good quality.  That means substantive.  That means original ideas and new information.  That means well written.
  • Make sure all your submissions are quality.  You will develop a reputation, and when people see your avatar, they will pay attention.
  • The title is important.  Make sure it’s enticing so that people want to check it out.
  • Vote for other people’s stuff.  Yes, people will return the favor.  Nobody votes for stuff left by a hit-and-run marketer.
  • Comment on other people’s stuff.  It’s a great way to get noticed. Make sure your comments are substantive and add to the discussion – you want to be noticed as someone of interest, not as a pest.
  • Invite some friends to join the community.  Not only are they your natural supporters, but others will appreciate that you have helped grow the community.
  • Don’t be shy to ask for help.  That’s what Twitter is for: “Can you please check out my latest sub at SBsite X?  Votes, comments, shares appreciated.”

“Pop” stands for “popular”.  Stories that are voted “popular” usually pop to the front page of social bookmarking websites.  On many sites this is called being “published”.

 


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Four unique social bookmarking gems

Friday, May 14th, 2010

Once again, we’ve improved The Bookmarketer by adding four very unique social bookmarking gems: BizSugar, MMO, Tipbo and Kirtsy.

TheBookmarketer is a blogger’s best friend, making it easy for readers to spread the word about blog posts they like.  Two lines of code posted into the template for single posts, and they have instant access to post a link and recommendation to your blog on 75 websites.  In addition to popular social bookmarking websites like Digg, Reddit, StumbleUpon, Mixx and Delicious, your blog posts can now be easily added to these four new social bookmarking gems.

bizsugarbannerjpj

BizSugar is a vibrant community of bloggers and others who share blog posts and news stories related to small business and sales.  They typically share stories related to managing a small business or freelance operation, marketing both online and off, human resources, motivation and more.  One thing that makes this a vibrant community is that submitters don’t just sub and run;  many take the time to look at others’ submissions, vote and comment.  Only small business related articles.

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MMO is a young community of mostly bloggers interested in sharing tips and stories related to making money online.  Although fairly new, it is quite vibrant and for that reason has been added to The Bookmarketer.  As with BizSugar, what makes this already a vibrant community is how submitters don’t do hit-and-run submissions;  they take the time to review, vote and comment on other people’s submissions, too.  Only articles or posts related to working online, please.

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Tipbo is a unique social bookmarking service.  Although it does not cover a single niche – you can submit articles about knitting, hockey, dental fillings, closing a sale, or the best way to pickle and iguana brain – it accepts only one type of article: tips and advice.  So news articles, stories, biographies, funny videos and images are all out. 

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Kirtsy is also a somewhat unique social bookmarking service.  Although it accepts the full range of topics and in pretty much any form, you don’t have to be a member to vote (although only members can submit items and leave comments).  And there is no voting button.  A simple click on the title is all that is needed to vote.  In many ways, this makes it a must-use service for bloggers who can share the submission via Twitter or FaceBook.

And I should not miss an opportunity to remind you that if your blog is Canadian, you really should be submitting posts also to http://www.Zoomit.ca (and voting for other good submissions while you are there).

 


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