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Archive for May, 2014

How to choose a website platform – the only guide you’ll need

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Like choosing a suit, you have options when building a website.  Do you go custom-tailored or off-the-rack?  This is your guide to making that decision.

There is a derisive expression in English called “off the rack”.  It means to buy something premade, and it more specifically refers to men’s suits.  There are two ways to buy a suit:

  • Custom tailored, so that every measurement exactly fits your body.
  • Off the rack – premade at a factory in a number of sizes, one of which should be pretty close to what your body requires.

I don’t know about you, but I have never bought a custom tailored suit.  For starters, it costs a lot in time.  In addition to choosing the fabric, you have to stand there to get pinned.  Then you have to return to the store to pick it up.  Two trips to a store instead of just one – not fair!  More importantly, a custom tailored suit costs more money.  The price for custom-tailored is measured in thousands of dollars; the price for off-the-rack is measured in hundreds of dollars.

Build your websiteThat’s a big difference.

What does all this have to do with building a website?  You can get websites off the rack or have them custom built, too.  And the same factors apply to building a website as apply to buying a suit.

Some people will scratch their heads and ask, “Are you nuts?” to get a website built from scratch, because the cost is so much higher.

Other people will scratch their heads and ask, “Are you nuts?” to buy a ready-made website, because their discriminating eyes can see a difference in quality that many people would not notice.

The fact is that most websites these days are a hybrid of off-the-rack structure and custom-tailored design.  Many sites are built on WordPress (originally just a blogging platform that has recently been adapted to other types of websites), Drupal, Magneto or Joomla.  These content management systems (CMS) have all the structure in place; you just have to add your own custom design, and choose features to add as modules or plugins.

Many other sites are offered as ready-to-use programs, or “hosted solutions”, such as IM Creator, Weebly or Shopify.  In other words, you take one of their templates and customize it with your graphics, maybe pick-and-choose from certain features, and you are ready to go.

To the end user, a website built from scratch, a website built on a CMS, and a website built from a hosted solution don’t look any different.  What is different is the back-end, the amount of effort required to maintain the website and the pricing. According to Erez Zundelevich, VP Online Marketing of  IM Creator.

“Our users create websites that look and feel just like they have been custom-built, without all the hassles of actually having to build a website. Our market is people who don’t want to spend money and time running a website, so that they can focus on running their business.”

Custom built website

Obviously, the most expensive option is to build from scratch.  There are some excellent reasons to do this, and if you have the financial means, why not?  Like getting a custom suit made or like designing your own house to your exact specifications, why not design your own website?  Assuming you have the money.  And the time.

Quote - Joshua AlexanderIt is not just the upfront cost to factor in.  You will also have to manage your own hosting and look after your own security, you will be fully responsible for your own SEO and whenever you want something fixed, changed or added, you will need to hire someone to do it for you.  If you have the money, these are not issues, of course.

A custom-built website is not always just a matter of prestige, as is a custom-tailored suit.  Nor just a matter of preferences, as is a custom designed house.  There are things you might need to do to run your business that just don’t come in a box.  Just as exceedingly tall people or very portly people might need to have custom-tailored suits, some businesses are doing things differently enough that they just need a custom-built website.

Joshua Alexander, who does custom coding, explains the advantage of building to custom specifications:

“It allows them to build a system with understanding of potential growth into the future. I always ask clients what they can see themselves needing in the future so I can see if we can plan that into the initial design and development.”

Custom coding is ideal for someone who wants to do something really different and can afford to do so – someone who doesn’t mind being fully responsible for all aspects of the website, and can afford to be.

CMS based websites

CMS based websites cost less than custom-built websites, because the architecture is already in place.  If you use WordPress, the platform is 100 percent free, and most of the optional features (called “plugins” in WordPress) are also free, although there are some that cost money.  Drupal, Joomla and several other lesser-known CMS platforms operate on a similar basis.

Although the structure of the website is free, there is still some tailoring involved.  You will still have to hire a designer, and in most cases you will want a “theme”, which might be free or might cost money, and  which is not always easy to install without some basic programming knowledge.  A “theme” in WordPress is more than just the look; it is a coding structure of how elements of the page appear.  Some themes are easy-peasy to use, others hijack your interface and actually require some pretty advanced programming skills to navigate.  Yes, I’ve been there.

If you have some coding skills, and are willing to spend the time, a CMS based website might be for you.  You will still be responsible for your own hosting and for the site’s security.  If you want to make changes, you can always get plugins or hire somebody to do custom coding.  The CMS is free, but customization of both the design and the features still requires hiring somebody (or learning a fair amount).  Basically, it is a lot like taking a huge short cut to a custom coded website.

Here is a great video leading you through the process…

CMS based websites are ideal for people whose pockets are not too deep and who are willing and able to look after their own website or hire someone who is capable.

Hosted Solutions

Unless you can do your own coding, the cheapest path is a hosted solution.  Like a CMS-based website, there are rarely any up-front fees, although you might want to hire a designer to do custom design work so that your website looks like yours and nobody else’s.  When we spoke with Erez Zundelevich, he said IM Creator connects customers with designers familiar with their code structure on request.

Henri Goldsmann of Blunt Pencil, recounts how he built his custom website on the IM Creator platform:

“I built the site myself. Though the templates looked very professional, I wanted to see how far I could take this. I used a template, and deleted all the elements, kept the basic frame in order for the site to display well on a tablet and smartphone as well.”

However, if you are really strapped for cash and don’t have Henri Goldsmann’s skills or interest level, the major hosted solutions all offer very nice templates that you can use until you can afford to replace or tweak them with custom artwork.  Just double-check that you are allowed to do so before signing up.

Quote - Erez ZundelevichSome offer free plans, but in most cases you’ll want to pay for at least a basic upgrade. For eCommerce there are often transaction fees.  A transaction fee might be when you sell clothes or crafts or gadgets through the shopping cart on your website.  This would obviously not be a cost if your website is for a cafe or a tattoo parlor or a motel.

Where you really save money, time and headaches with a hosted solution is on maintenance, such as security, fixing things that break, adding features, updating things that seem to change so ridiculously fast on the Internet, etc.  You don’t have to learn to code and you don’t have to hire anybody, and for the most part you don’t have to monitor such things.  That is all taken care of for you.  In most cases, the monthly price is less than what it would cost to have a coder taking care of things, and you don’t have to worry about managing any of the technology.

Erez Zundelevich explains:

“The biggest benefit of a hosted solution like IM Creator is that a small business can have a professional looking website, without having it drain their time and energy looking after it. That is worth more financially to an entrepreneur than the actual cost savings of design and programming.”

Here is a short video he shared with us about how a hosted solution works:

 

Hosted solutions are ideal for people who don’t want to invest the time and energy in becoming web savvy or in taking care of a website, and don’t want to spend the money to hire someone who can.

Are hosted solutions too good to be true?

Does this sound too good to be true?  In life, you get what you pay for.  You save money and save time looking after the website, but you do lose flexibility.  For instance, if your business eventually grows to be as big as Amazon, you will eventually have to fork up for custom programming, dedicated servers, etc.

And there are some risks with hosted solutions, so make sure to cover your backside on just a few critical items.

Make sure you legally own the content.  A reputable hosted solution will not claim ownership of your text or images.  Of course, if you use one of their templates, you won’t own that.

Make sure you practically own the content.  Some businesses are riskier than others.  For instance, if you run a tattoo parlor, who knows when an image might be seen as offensive by someone and the site gets taken down for a terms-of-service violation.  And any business can lose its website if the hosted solution goes out of business.  When Windows Live Spaces shut down, they gave a six-month migration period, but there is no telling what might happen if some other hosted solution shuts down and doesn’t give users any options.  In other words, keep a back-up copy of all text and images and anything you actually own.

According to Jeremy Wong, of all the hosted solutions, only Weebly and IM Creator allow you to export your website from their platforms, so if you need to go elsewhere, you have more than just the images and text on file.  There is a good comparison of these two services here.

Make sure they cover all the bases.  You want a site that is HTML5 compliant, so that it shows well on all devices, one that has SEO built in (that does not mean you will rank well, just that the fundamentals are there, on which a good ranking can be built) and that there are good security measures in place to protect against hacking and other threats.  Ask these questions before signing up for any hosted solution, because these are some of the tasks you are delegating to them when you sign up.

Own your domain.  Make sure that when you set up your website, regardless of platform, that you own and you control your domain.  That is your business real estate and your business identity on the Internet.

The bottom line

I think it’s fair to say that all three approaches have worked well for many happy people, and there are probably plenty of nightmare stories that can be told from each option.

Quote - David LeonhardtJoshua Alexander told me the story of having to rebuild an exact replica of a website because the designer/ programmer had control of the site…until he died in a car crash.  The owner had no access, and the man who did was dead.

That story reminded me of a time I had to fight to get control of the domain name on behalf of a client, because the programmer had registered it in his own name and had subsequently vanished off the face of the Earth.  Funny story, because I actually went to knock on his door in Akron, Ohio…and discovered that his address did not even exist.  I finally tracked down a former partner of his in Chicago (by phone) and somehow recovered the client’s domain.  Once again, the importance of owning your domain, both legally and practically, is evident.

In short, even if you hire people to do custom work, you still need to make sure you own everything.

I have worked on many websites that have been custom built and many that are CMS based.  I have not worked on any hosted-solution websites, because they just don’t need me.

So which is better, custom tailored websites, CMS-based websites or hosted solutions?  As with suits, that’s a no brainer.  But that is the wrong question to ask.  The question is which approach is right for your business?  And that depends on your budget and how much time and effort you want to invest in your website.

 

 


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The many dangers of NoFollow

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

NoFollow linking has never been so prominent, and never has it been so dangerous for both ethical and practical reasons.

I don’t like the NoFollow attribute.  When it was introduced in 2005, it made so much sense.  But since then it has been abused by both webmasters and the search engines, and that abuse looks poised to make a quantum leap sometime soon.

Therefore, there are two mes that don’t like NoFollow:

  • The ethical me, who much prefers to be honest when I promote a website.
  • The practical me, who much prefers not to be slapped down, tied up and fed to a herd of half-starved ninja gators when Google wakes up in 2015 or 2016, or gets displaced by an upstart.

I will cover three things in this blog post.  Yes, I’m organized!

  1. The history of NoFollow, which many newer marketers today are unaware of, and many who were around in 2005 might have forgotten.
  2. The ethical case to avoid using NoFollow (As a matter of fact, it is important.)
  3. The practical case to avoid using an attribute that could blow up in your face in a few years.

The short, tumultuous history of NoFollow

The NoFollow “tag”, as it has often been called, is not a tag.  It is an “attribute” (for those interested in correct use of language), which can be added to any <a href=””> tag.  It tells the search engines not to follow the link, because the owner of the website on which it appears cannot vouch for its trustworthiness.  Just to be clear, NoFollow does not necessarily mean that a link is bad.  It only means that the link has not been vetted by the website’s owner or administrator.

NoFollow's sordid history

The NoFollow attribute was introduced in early 2005 to stop blog comment spam, or at least to make it easier for the search engines to distinguish between links from legitimate comments and links from spam-happy bots.

Here is the direct quote from the Official Google Blog:

Q: How does a link change?
A: Any link that a user can create on your site automatically gets a new “nofollow” attribute. So if a blog spammer previously added a comment like

Visit my <a href=”http://www.example.com/”>discount pharmaceuticals</a> site.

That comment would be transformed to

Visit my <a href=”http://www.example.com/” rel=”nofollow”>discount pharmaceuticals</a> site.

Q: What types of links should get this attribute?
A: We encourage you to use the rel=”nofollow” attribute anywhere that users can add links by themselves, including within comments, trackbacks, and referrer lists. Comment areas receive the most attention, but securing every location where someone can add a link is the way to keep spammers at bay.

Matt Cutts, Google  chief “web spam” spokesperson, said:

“Wherever it means that another person placed a link on your site, that would be appropriate.”

Matt Cutts confirmed this in 2009 on his own blog:

“Nofollow is method (introduced in 2005 and supported by multiple search engines) to annotate a link to tell search engines ‘I can’t or don’t want to vouch for this link.’ In Google, nofollow links don’t pass PageRank and don’t pass anchortext.”

In other words, if you are not moderating your blog comments or other user-generated content, this will allow you to continue being careless or lazy or otherwise occupied without gumming up Google’s rankings.  And it’s not just Google.  MSN and Yahoo were involved in announcing simultaneously their support of the attribute.  In 2005, Google had about 37 percent market share, Yahoo had 30 percent, and MSN had 16 percent.  AOL and Ask Jeeves were still players, with ten and six percent respectively.

PageRank Sculpting

It was not long before some webmasters with overactive imaginations found a way to use NoFollow to their advantage through a method that came to be called “PageRank Sculpting”.

As you are probably aware, PageRank is the relative value of a page, and is the most visible of over 100 ranking signals.  Very roughly, the PageRank of a page is calculated based on the value of all the pages linking to it.  Each of those pages has its own PageRank, which it divides up evenly between all the pages it links to.  If you need to read up on the subject, I suggest this post by Danny Sullivan.

The key thing to understand about PageRank is that If a page contains 20 links, it divides its power 20 ways.  However, if it contains only 15 links, it divides its power 15 ways, sending more PageRank power to each of the 15 pages.

PageRank sculpting is the process of NoFollowing certain internal links, so that other internal links are more powerful.  The theory is that if every page of your website points to the contact, about, terms, and other administrative pages, that means a lot of PageRank power that could be going to money pages is being poorly directed.  By adding the NoFollow attribute to those admin links, webmasters believed that they were funneling more PageRank to their money pages.

To the best of my knowledge, nobody got penalized for doing this, but in in 2009 Google changed the way it read NoFollow links to make PageRank sculpting useless.  Webmasters got the idea, as PageRank Sculpting quickly went out of style.  But an important question about all this PageRank sculpting has to be asked, “What were they thinking?!?  NoFollowing links to their own pages from their own pages?  Telling the search engines that they can’t vouch for their own contact and about pages?  Saying, “Hey Google, I am such a shifty character that I don’t even trust myself”?  </rant>

Just wait for the other shoe to drop.

NoFollowing paid links

It was not only webmasters who played fast and loose with the rules.  Google took its turn, too.  In fact, Google now advises:

“In order to prevent paid links from influencing search results and negatively impacting users, we urge webmasters use nofollow on such links.”

Quite apart from the inconvenient truth that almost every link has been paid for in one form or another (yes, “earned” links can be very costly to “earn”), the fact is that there is no link more firmly vetted than a paid link.  A webmaster has to think much harder, “Is this money really worth possibly harming my site’s trust with visitors and the search engines?” than when they link for free.

NoFollowing unnatural/suspicious/random links

But Google seems to have moved past encouraging NoFollow just on paid links.  They seem to be quietly encouraging people to add NoFollow to a very widely defined array of low-quality links, unnatural links, suspicious links (those that might actually be natural, but Google really can’t tell the difference, so why not discredit them just in case) and seemingly random links.

Oh, and press releases.

These days, it seems that almost any link could be flagged as “unnatural” by Google, with so-called “manual” penalties being the result.  Many of Google’s recent manual penalties seem designed to upstage Monty Python.  Recovery from some of the more ridiculous penalties seems almost as random, and I have heard many people saying that by simply adding NoFollow to links, they have been able to recover.

In fact, many people writing about manual penalty recovery can be seen offering advice like this:

“After disavowing or no-following links, webmasters must submit a reconsideration request to Google. If the problem is not completely cleared, Google will send a denial message.”

Or advice like this:

“If it’s high quality, but just linked in the wrong way, ask the webmaster to add a nofollow attribute assigned to it.”

If you are wondering, “What’s next?”, so am I.  At this point, I have seen at least one example of almost every type of link drawing a penalty, and Google seems to be accepting  the NoFollow attribute as a way of crossing the blurry line of what is an is not acceptable on every third Tuesday, is the wind is blowing from the northeast with a faint whiff of Lavender in the air. In fact, Google has said that the Disavow tool is like a huge NoFollowifier.  Here is what Google’s John Mueller has to say on the matter:

“You don’t need to include any nofollow links…because essentially what happens with links that you submit as a disavow, when we recrawl them we treat them similarly to other nofollowed links.  Including a nofollow link there wouldn’t be necessary.”

Which brings us to today.  I watch, mouth hanging wide open (but not drooling on myself, just to reassure you), the mass NoFollowing of links that some desperate webmasters are doing.  There are plugins for WordPress, such as WP External Links and External Links.

I’ll go into why I think this is crazy below, but some highly respectable people have been driven by Google’s seemingly random penalties to actually use these tools.  Lisa of Inspire to Thrive  explains why she installed the WP External Links Plugin:

“I don’t agree with their nofollow policy or shall we say HINT of it but I don’t want to be penalized by this giant and I’d love to see how long the process takes so we can all learn something from this one.

Why NoFollow is unethical

You should not tell a lie.  NoFollow is ethical on user generated content, not because that is why it was created in the first place, but because it tells the truth.  Unless the website administrator moderates all user-generated content, such as on good quality blogs, the truth is that he or she cannot vouch for the links.  NoFollow truthfully communicates that to anyone who wishes to read that attribute, including search engines.

If NoFollow communicates that you cannot vouch for a link that you have in fact approved, that is a blatant lie.

NoFollow - what about your users?

Google is not the Internet. The main reason most people are adding the NoFollow attribute where it does not belong is in response to Google’s displeasure with certain links or the website administrator’s fear of Google’s displeasure with certain links.  Numerous statements by Google have led people to believe that Google wants people to add NoFollow to the links that Google has chosen to find irritating.

The problem is that Google is not the Internet.  There are other search engines and possibly other applications that will use your NoFollow attribute as a signal, too.  NoFollow tells others that the link is not trustworthy, too. It’s not just Google being lied to.

Read Google’s Webmaster Guidelines.  Google’s official guidelines, as vague as they are, are a lot more ethical than its enforcement is (Oh, that’s a whole other ethics topic that the company whose motto is “Don’t be evil” probably would rather I don’t get into).  Let’s see what the Quality Guidelines say:

“Don’t deceive your users.”

So if you are telling the search engines, I won’t vouch for this link, are you telling your users, too?  Just asking.

“Avoid tricks intended to improve search engine rankings.”

Like adding a hidden attribute, for instance.  Those who are old enough to remember what a search engine penalty meant before 2011, will recall that it meant you had done something sneaky and deceptive.  You were a dirty rotten crook, serving up different information to the search engines than to real people:

  • Doorway pages.
  • Hidden text.
  • Hidden links.

Search engines penalized websites for serving up different content to users and to robots, and rightly so.  So what about NoFollow links, where the link is viewable by users but not by search engines?

“A good rule of thumb is whether you’d feel comfortable explaining what you’ve done to a website that competes with you, or to a Google employee.”

“So, you see, I inserted this hidden NoFollow attribute because I don’t want to get in trouble with Google, but I’m OK sending my readers there.  Yes, I know that means I’m either a scammer sending users to a crap link, or a total wuss allowing Google to bully me into blocking robots from following a perfectly good link.” Hmm.  Sure, that’s what I would tell my competitor or a Google employee.

“Another useful test is to ask, ‘Does this help my users? Would I do this if search engines didn’t exist?’”

Seriously, would you put NoFollow in a link if search engines didn’t exist?

NoFollow means not taking responsibility for actions.  There are two main constraints that keep us from linking to bad neighbourhoods; because users might follow the links and because search engines might follow the links.  Putting NoFollow on bad links does not solve any real problem (it might help Google solve its problems), and makes it 50% more tempting to post a bad link.  In other words, far from cleaning up the Web, it is likely increasing the number of poor quality links, especially those posted on poor quality sites.

Why NoFollow is dangerous

Now, it might be that ethics are a less pressing worry on your mind than where you’ll find money to pay the rent, so maybe you are more interested in getting back lost rankings than in being 100 percent authentic and ethical.  Well, here are five reasons why NoFollow could bite you in that soft fleshy padding you sit on.

1. It might not work.  I have seen no official statistics on how many websites recover from different types of penalties, but it certainly sounds like a majority of those that bother trying don’t succeed on the first or second try.

2. You might lose rankings at Bing, Yahoo and other search engines.  Of course, they don’t have the same market share, so you might be willing to sacrifice all of them in order to access the 66 percent of searches that Google delivers.  But what if you NoFollow all your links and instead of winning Google’s approval, you simply lose your Bing and Yahoo rankings? Oops.

But that is just the short-term, and short-term is short-sighted, even if your main concern is next month’s rent.  The long term is what really counts.

3. Google might get you later on. At the current rate, half the Internet will be disassembled, Disavowed or NoFollowed before long, all because Google doesn’t want to count certain links in its algorithm.  What then?  The disassembled part (links people have removed) will no longer be there, but Google will have a huge database of domains that have been disavowed once, twice, thrice or 673 times.  Google will have a huge database of websites that have tons of NoFollow links pointing to them.  It won’t be hard to add into its algorithm a trust factor to account for how often a particular domain has been disavowed or NoFollowed.

Google will also have data on which websites NoFollow their links.  Ah, let’s follow the logic trail.  Google tells websites to NoFollow crappy links.  Website A has 300 NoFollow links on its site.  Website B has 3 NoFollow links on its site.  In Google’s mind, NoFollow means crappy links.  Hmmm.  Which site will Google consider more trustworthy?  Which site will Google see as less trustworthy.  It’s kind of a NoBrainer.  When you look at it from that perspective, is it worth sending such a negative message about your own website? Wikipedia will always be able to get away with it, but could your website?

Don’t believe this could ever happen?  Go back a few years when the best practice was to have keyword-rich anchor tex in most of your inbound links, only to make sure you varied your text.  Now, websites are getting penalized for doing just that.  Go back a few more years when the best practice was exact match keyword anchor text.  That will land you in even more trouble today.

Google is now punishing websites for links that were built in accordance with their guidelines as far back as 2004 and 2005.  What you do today can come back to bite you tomorrow and even a decade from now.

4. Other search engines might get you later on. It’s just too easy.  Not every NoFollow link is crap and not every DoFollow link is amazing.  But if a search engine plays the averages, they can reduce the trust of websites littered with NoFollow links and increase the trust of websites that are clean.

5. Google’s rule is ephemeral.  I know it seems like Google rules the world.  But there are other search engines like Blekko and Duck Duck Go (as I wrote about here), and who knows where Bing or Yahoo might be headed?  Google controls 66 percent of search traffic now, but what if that share was to fall?

Can’t happen?  Think again.

Remember when Alta Vista ruled search?

Remember when MySpace was social networking?

Remember when Netscape was everybody’s browser of choice?

Remember when Digg was synonymous with social bookmarking?

Remember when Google ruled search?  It still does, but sooner or later, that question will come up.  And all the NoFollow attributes placed just for Google’s sake will serve as … what?

Your turn.  What do you think?

I would love to hear from you.  I certainly don’t have the last word on this.  I have not liked NoFollow from the start.  I called out Wikepedia on this in 2007, even going so far as to say Wikipedia should be spanked (I really do like the site; I just don’t like their NoFollow policy).

NoFollow made sense for what it was designed to do, but I have always thought that it sends a very bad signal to anyone watching, including search engines.  Obviously, not everybody feels the same way.  Some people might even today be using it for PageRank sculpting.

I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments below, or on blog posts of your own.  Support me.  Refute me.  Let’s get this out in the open and discuss it logically.

 

 

 


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