David Leonhardt’s SEO and Social Media Marketing

Tips for better SEO (search engine optimization) and website marketing …

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What if Google doesn’t rule the world?

While getting your site burnt to the ground in Google search is undeniably a huge setback, it is not the end of the world. Before abandoning your website, consider the alternatives to Google search traffic.

When most people think of the word “search engine”, they think about Google. Just “Google it” is even considered a verb by most people. While Google is the number one search engine, and mighty convenient much of the time, it is not the only search option. That is really good news for bloggers and small business owners who have been devastated by the recent Panda, Penguin and Hummingbird blitzes.

In fact, when done right, you can find the other search engines so useful to your business that you might not have to rely on Google search for your business ever again.

Alternatives to Google search

First, Google is not the only search engine. Surprisingly enough, other search engines like Bing, Yahoo, Baidu, Ask, Blekko and DuckDuckGo exist to help you find whatever you are looking for online. These smaller search engines make up approximately 26 percent of searches around the world.

While nowhere near Google’s dominance, over the past year Google has slipped to 67 percent of searches. What that means is that Google’s lead while strong is not infallible to a disruptive search technology – remember when Alta Vista ruled search and Netscape ruled browsers?

Where else do people search?

Second, you could also start searching through directories.  Remember how directories like DMOZ , Aviva and JoeAnt used to be how people found things before search engines took over? In fact, that’s how Google used to find websites.

Niche directories can still be more useful than search engines, such as local city directories (I’ve used Ottawa Start for certain searches.)  You can sometimes find more detailed and categorized information in these directories, and you don’t have to wade through irrelevant results from similar-sounding searches.

Niche directories like Aviva and Technocrati even have blog directories, where you can search for peer bloggers in your niche. This is a superb resource for blog research and blogger outreach.

Third, you might find what you want in video format. Have you ever considered that video sharing sites like YouTube and Vimeo are just large video search engines? Video is not just for music and old TV shows anymore.  You can find almost any information you want on YouTube.

While YouTube is a Google product, they have their own search engine on the site specifically for videos. Also, Vimeo is a great place to find specific channels with quality information, since they have standards on who is allowed to post content.

Fourth, use Amazon search for your product needs. Amazon can help you find almost any book, electronic, MP3, or product on the planet. With millions of their own products, plus Amazon stores with millions upon millions of additional products, this truly is the search engine of shopping.  Oh, and eBay.  And Kijiji here in Canada.  And Craigslist.  Lots of great places to look for products, new and used.

If you are a retailer, setting up an Amazon store and getting found on their search engine could be more important than being found on Google. Think about this for a second? Would you rather have your clients searching on Google, going from site to site, or on Amazon where they have one click processing for registered users?

Fifth, welcome to the era of social search. Sites like Facebook and Twitter have very dynamic search features. Twitter invented hashtag searches, which are now standard also on Facebook, Pinterest and Google Plus.

Facebook has recently been updating its search recently to try and compete actively with Google search. Its graph search not only takes in the words you are looking for, but also incorporates your own social network in the results. That way, you can search for information that people in your network already provide.

Think about this example for a moment. You write a blog post about “Real Estate Investing.” While that might be a crowded term on Google, you know that a number of your friends on Facebook regularly search for this keyword to build connections.  The next time they do a search on Facebook for real estate investing, you have an increased chance of showing up in their search. What we are talking about here is targeted prospects learning about what you do, and coming to see your content.  So it matters who you know on Facebook.

Google Plus is beginning to use this approach, but it is too early to tell if it will catch on.

Twitter search, while a bit more limited, works in a similar fashion if you want to see who has spoken about specific topics. You can do twitter searches for specific keywords, and find out who is talking about your product and/or industry. This is a great way to prospect for new followers and blog subscribers – much better than using a search engine.

Sixth, industry search engines are also used for business to business searches.  You have to pay for your place in Thomasnet, but it can bring in  a lot of business.  Many companies search for suppliers in busines-to-business search engines. Even if you cannot be found in Google, your listing in a niche search engine can be found when people search Google.

More than one way to be found

As you can see, while Google might rule traditional search, there are still a lot of ways for people to be found via other social networks. The key is to figure out where your target market is, and how they search. Then you can augment your strategy to be found on multiple search engines. My question for you is where do you want to be found online?

 

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7 Responses to “What if Google doesn’t rule the world?”

  1. Roy A. Ackerman, Ph.D., E.A. (3 comments) Says:

    I stopped using Google long ago. I don’t like that it “selects” the information it shows based upon what it thinks I want to see. Which means opposing viewpoints are often omitted, scientific data is excised, etc.
    Great service you provided here, David, to illustrate that there are alternatives to this behemoth.

  2. Kaloyan Banev (4 comments) Says:

    Right before the first Panda update, I wrote an article regarding De-Googalization. I tried to submit it as guest post in some of the most popular SEO portals. It was rejected everywhere, so I publish it on my blog. I see a lot of similarities and the main key is to rely on many different sources of traffic.

  3. David Leonhardt (140 comments) Says:

    In the words of the great David Ogilvy (I paraphrase): Never take on a client too big to lose.

    I guess that applies equally to traffic sources.

  4. Gary Whalen (1 comments) Says:

    Have been with msn, yahoo, bing, etc. for years but only discovered that Google has a social place in G+ where I created a string called newcomers. One told me I should make the dozen or so pictures and comments in my Profile public instead of of private. Picture of gal looking in the file cabinet gave me hope I could talk with a non-geek. I get to my paid Yuku Forums through Google but I am not supposed to say that in public I guess. In the past I have found that Google results are about 50% when I ask – many times some searchers tell me ‘did you really want something else?’

  5. Lynne (8 comments) Says:

    Thanks for the info. Definitely google is on the top of search engines but like you said there are others. It is good to know that we still have other alternatives.

  6. Oscar (1 comments) Says:

    I’m personally looking into duckduckgo and am using it more often now. However, as for an online marketing stand point of view, you would still focus your attention more on Google since they have a huge share of the search pie.

  7. Simon (10 comments) Says:

    The problem for us in Europe is that Google is much more dominant than in the USA.
    You mention 67% market share but in Europe their share is over 88%.
    We really need somone to mount some serious competition over here!

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